Why I’m voting Conservative in the snap election

theresa may

Yesterday, from out of nowhere, Prime Minister Theresa May decided to call a snap general election, which was passed in the House of Commons today, meaning of course that we’ll have yet another round of voting for us beleaguered Brits in about seven weeks time. To be honest, I had a slight suspicion that there might be an early election, but I was taken aback by how soon and sudden this came up. Before that, I decided that if a snap election were to occur, I would vote for the Conservatives, and now that there is a snap election, you probably know where this is going.

Some of you may find this odd. Why would I willingly cast my vote for the party that I spent the past few years excoriating with ceaseless zeal? Well for starters I am not the leftist teenager that I used to be, and I wish I had actually done more research back then too. Second, let’s consider the reality of the political situation in Britain today. Brexit is definitely happening now despite all the establishment’s attempts to stop it, and right now, Theresa May, whatever you may think of her policies, is the only politician with the ability and the will to make it happen.

UKIP is probably closer to my more libertarian positions, but they’re completely useless. Think about it for a moment. The one thing UKIP was founded for, Britain leaving the EU, is already being accomplished under the current government. As long as this is the case, UKIP has no purpose in the political arena, other than potentially stealing Labour seats from the north. In a normal election I suppose I would endorse the UK Libertarian Party, but I don’t think they will have much of an impact in a sudden snap election. Plus, I don’t know anyone running as an MP for the Libertarian Party who I can vote for.

While we’re here, let’s talk about the other parties. I hope nobody tries to convince me to vote for the Liberal Democrats, because they will quickly find it impossible to convince me to vote for the pack of snivelling sell-outs that the Lib Dems. Under Tim Farron, they’ve become a party for social justice warriors, as if the Green Party wasn’t already. I honestly think the Lib Dems want to fail. Their leader is a useless wimp, and they don’t seem to know how to appeal to ordinary voters. And then there’s Labour, the sad socialist club whose leader was practically salivating over the prospect of a snap election, one in which he will undoubtedly be crushed because he is less popular than most British politicians. At this point, they’d do better if they kept Ed Miliband as leader. Even worse are Corbyn’s deluded fans, those larping revolutionaries who will finally get the chance to campaign for their dear leader, lose, then protest the outcome and start a petition to kick the Tories out.

I should reiterate that I don’t actually agree with most of the Tories’ policies. In fact, if I was a Tory, I’d probably be a very crappy Tory. My policies, which would be considered centre-right in America, would probably be considered too far-right for the Conservatives, which I mostly consider to be conservative in name only. The main reason I am voting Conservative in this election is because I know exactly why Theresa May called this election. It’s a move to strengthen her majority, and giver her government democratic legitimacy, all while thinning out the Labour opposition while it’s already weak. In short, I think she wants to attain a larger majority, which will be easier for her to work with while she’s negotiating the Brexit terms with Brussels.

I know full well that the snap election is a political power move on Theresa May’s part, but I am not voting for the Tories on ideological lines. You may remember that I wrote in favour of leaving the EU. Now that we are leaving the EU, this country needs a capable leader who will deliver on the will of the people, and at the moment the only one who can rise to the challenge is Theresa May. I dislike much of her policies, but I think leaving the European Union takes precedent over everything else at the moment, and I want a government that will deliver on its promise. If Theresa May wants her democratic mandate then as far as I’m concerned she can have it. After all, she has thus far demonstrated that she is more than capable of delivering Brexit, while Labour, the Lib Dems and the Green Party have openly opposed it, and UKIP will do nothing to help, having served its purpose.

I leave you with some predictions for the election in June:

  1. The Tories will win in a landslide victory, increasing their majority by at least 40 seats.
  2. Labour will lose at least 30 seats, and Jeremy Corbyn will either resign or be challenged in a new leadership contest some time in the autumn.
  3. The Lib Dems won’t gain or lose many seats, UKIP will probably steal seats from Labour if they gain any at all.

I doubt that it will be a very exciting campaign however, given how exhausted the general public is when it comes to national politics. One thing I can guarantee is that, after the Tories win again, the left-wing media and the progressive busy-bodies will throw a hissy fit yet again, but this time nobody will care.

However you vote in June’s election, I hope that people won’t pick each other apart over they plan to vote, or are at least less enthused about it than they were in last year’s bitterly divisive referendum campaign.

What now?

donald trumpAfter weeks of hibernating, I’ve decided to come back to my post, and in this tumultuous of all days, it looks like I’m having to talk about the election, or rather, President Trump (I still can’t believe I’m writing this, but here we are). As you can expect, the left-wing media and the social justice warriors are all in full panic mode, and why wouldn’t they be? The masses have disobeyed them at every turn, because they’ve decided that they’d rather have Trump, with his moderate nationalism, than the most corrupt politician we’ve seen in years.

I should reiterate that I’m not a Trump supporter, but I can see how we got to this point (and tried to explain it myself in real life, but I didn’t want tensions to inflame too much), and remain sympathetic to the average American who voted Trump, so before I continue, I think I should briefly clear up why most of America voted Trump, since you’re most likely in a state of utter disbelief. The whole reason America voted Trump is because the average working class has been disenfranchised by the political establishment, and tarred and feathered as scum of the earth by the media and cultural establishment.

Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, represented all that Americans hated about the political establishment – the crony capitalism, the hawkish foreign policy, the ignoring and shaming of the working class. They’re fed up with the nonsense they’ve had to put up with from the cultural and political overclass, fed up with the grandstanding from left-wing celebrities like John Oliver and Amy Schumer, and fed up with the lack of political will for reform in America, and so it’s no wonder that, in their desire for change (on which Obama did not deliver for the most part), they have chosen to elect Trump. After all, he has positioned himself as the only candidate willing to hear the voices of the working class, and it worked. Trump’s victory is the inevitable result of the establishment’s devaluing and demonising of the working class, just as Brexit was in the UK. If you ask me, the Democrats had it coming.

Personally, I feel that the most disappointing aspect of the election is Gary Johnson’s dismal failure of a campaign. I knew he wasn’t going to win, but I thought that the Libertarian Party would have more of a future if he had at least gotten 5% of the popular vote, and he failed to do that. He got 3% of the vote, meaning that a serious challenge to the two-party system is still a pipe dream, at least for now. I think it wouldn’t have been so bad if Gary Johnson didn’t screw up so much. But then, Gary was never going to be an effective challenge to someone as charismatic as Trump evidently was.

What can we expect next? Who knows, but one thing is clear. Whether you were pro-Trump or anti-Trump, whether you think he is a good businessman or an incompetent, brazen bigot, the election of Donald Trump represents a clear rejection of the political and cultural establishment, and whatever the outcome could have been, the Trump campaign has exposed the elites for the hollow, empty shells of people that they are. They have failed to make a positive case for Hillary, or their ideology, and have instead tried to tarnish the character of both Trump and the ordinary people who may have supported him. This is exactly like what the Remain camp was doing in Brexit, instead of trying to persuade Americans of a positive future in the EU (which they couldn’t), they instead smeared all Leave voters as “racist” or “xenophobic”, or whatever word they felt like.

Either way, Trump’s victory will live on as a major defeat for the progressive (sorry, regressive) left. They’ve taken it extremely personally, and now I see young people and leftists proclaiming that America is officially “stupider than the UK”.

disdain for plebs

This was found in the fine art department in my campus.

First of all, the text is woefully inaccurate. Only 48% of Americans voted for Trump, but less than that voted for Clinton. Second of all, the disdain coming from whoever made this is surely self-evident, as if suddenly Americans are morons just for voting Trump into power, and I think that’s disgusting. If you don’t like Trump, that’s fine. If you think he would make a bad president, that’s also fine, but it’s not okay to just bash ordinary people for their differences, and you certainly shouldn’t just trash the land that I love just because of it. Most of the people who voted Trump also voted for Obama, and they voted Republican because they feel that Obama’s administration screwed them over. I don’t think that’s stupid at all. I don’t give a damn who people vote for as long as you don’t bully, mistreat or alienate people just because they voted differently to how you would.

If this is the culture that is being challenged by Trump’s candidacy, then I think we are on the way towards seeing the defeat of the left, and the signs are everywhere. The liberal media is panicking like crazy, their policies are failing, their propaganda is being unanimously rejected, and their attempts to silence dissenting opinions are failing. As for Trump himself, I think I ought to congratulate him (I know I don’t agree with him entirely, but I think it’s the last honourable thing I can do). After all, Trump’s campaign from the word go has been met by all manner of opposition. He’s withstood all the slings and arrows from the controlled media, the current government, popular culture, and his political opponents. Nearly everyone tried to stop him, and yet hear he is. If anything about him impresses me at all, it’s that he had the balls to keep going despite all of that, and against the most powerful insider in American politics no less.

I must say that this election cycle has been ceaselessly interesting, but now that Trump’s elected, and once he’s sworn in, he has to not fuck up. He made a lot of promises throughout the campaign, some of them I dare say are bigger than any other politician’s promises to date. Winning the election is only half the battle for Trump. If he fails to deliver on his promises after all this, he will go down in history as the biggest loser in history. I say this not as someone who didn’t support Trump, but as someone who is watching America, and wondering what will become of it. If as he says he is interested in peaceful relations with Russia, then naturally I will look forward to that, but if he screws up, then we can enter the 2020’s with grim expectations.

An open letter to Gary Johnson

gary johnson

Dear Gary,

I may be a British national, but I have a profound love and appreciation for America, and partly because of that I have a noticeably keen interest in American politics. I’ve been observing the US election cycle for the past 15 months now, and at this point, I think it’s fairly obvious that your country is experiencing the most turbulent time in its history in many years, particularly as the two-party system is unravelling before our eyes.

Of course I’m concerned and frustrated by the fact that many Americans are condemned to choose between two candidates who I’m not convinced are fit for the job. On the left corner, we see Hillary Clinton, an incredibly corrupt, self-centred politician who will most likely continue the cultural and economic degradation we have seen under the Obama administration, and worse, will probably start an unnecessary war if it served her interests. On the right corner, we see Donald Trump, who I personally think isn’t nearly as bad as Hillary Clinton (and I can tell that a lot of what the media says about Trump isn’t true), and even though he might give the political establishment a good kick in the ass, I think his lack of political experience is a big concern. I could be wrong, and maybe Trump will turn out to be a good president, but he’s not the kind of candidate I would choose immediately.

In the middle, on the other hand, is you, the Libertarian nominee who is working tirelessly to throw a spanner in the works, and you are certainly making an impression on people who are tired of having to choose the lesser of two evils, as seems to be the case in pretty much every US election cycle. I’m aware that there are other third-party candidates out there, but they are both completely useless. The Greens’ Jill Stein is basically a shrill environmentalist with a race-baiting, anti-Semitic VP, and an all talk and no substance attitude that I find is actually worse than Donald Trump (in fact, I think of her as a far-left Trump). The far-right Constitution Party, meanwhile, has Darrell Castle, a deeply conservative candidate with zero credibility in a party with zero credibility. That in mind, you, Gary, are the last sane man in this entire election cycle, and I think you’re well aware of that.

You’re also the only candidate who I could trust to do the job well. Your credentials are more impressive than the others, being a two-term governor of New Mexico (a state that I’m sure you can easily win in November), and you’re also the only candidate out there who’s offering real, practical solutions to the problems facing America today. Trump has some solutions but I doubt that many of them will much good if at all, and all Hillary can do is call her opponents racist or sexist, as if that actually discourages people anymore. I also prefer you because, if elected president, you will perhaps make the biggest difference out of all them – namely the discrediting of the two-party system which has served to make presidential politics such a tribal affair in the first place.

For these reasons and more, you are perhaps the first presidential candidate I can actually believe in, and that is why I have some concerns with how you’re conducting yourself. I don’t have a problem with your campaign ads. If anything, I think they need to reach a wider audience (I don’t really know if they air on cable TV in your country so its hard for me to discern their reach). The problem, as I see it, is that you’re focused on appealing to the left. Given the awfulness of Hillary Clinton, and the failure of Bernie Sanders, that wouldn’t seem like a bad strategy, but I worry that you aren’t exactly trying to appeal to conservatives who might not like Trump but would vote for him just because of party loyalty.

My first problem is that you’re operating under the mainstream media narrative that Donald Trump is a brazen racist, which is something that can easily be disproven by the fact that he has had support from various members of the black community. You’ve also flip-flopped a few times, not nearly as much as the mainstream candidates, but enough to be concerned. You’ve come out in defence of Hillary Clinton, and then opposed her again. You’ve advocated for a “climate tax” and for mandatory vaccination, and then retracted it later. Worst of all however, is your latest faux-pas. In an interview with Guy Benson of Townhall.com, you got worked up over the use of the phrase “illegal immigrant”, claiming that it is “incendiary to the Hispanic population”, and you gave no reason why other than “it just is”. You sounded very much like a politically correct agitator wagging your finger at somebody for saying the wrong thing, and I worry that you don’t realise that this is part of the problem we’re having. Part of the reason why Trump gained so much momentum is because he didn’t give a damn about who he offended, and the establishment media’s response has exposed the biases of the cultural overclass. That you probably aren’t aware of this is worrying. If you can’t get the conservative vote, then you have no hope of defeating Donald Trump, who will most likely win the election because no self-respecting voter would think to trust someone as corrupt as Hillary, and getting the conservative vote will be nearly impossible if you keep ignoring the issues that have been handed over to Trump because the political establishment doesn’t give a damn about them.

I’m aware that you aren’t exactly the most popular among libertarians (in fact, you’re more progressive positions have made you rather divisive even for pro-Libertarian outlets), but you’re the best candidate we’ve got, and even then you’ve got to start upping your game. I still believe that America is greatest country in the world, and I believe that you, Gary, are the only candidate capable of making sure it remains that way for generations to come, but you can’t do it by appealing to the left alone. You need to convince the people most likely to vote for Trump that you are even better. Of course, I’m aware that your best chance can only come if you manage to get into the debates, and at the moment it looks doubtful, but I think you could do so much better. America needs you right now more than ever, and I think you can do so much more than appealing to left-wing sensibilities.

Good luck in the election Gary, you’re going to need it.

Sincerely,

Stefan Grasso

The Simpsons writers show their bias (in the ugliest way possible)

the simpsons 3am

It seems as if the producers of The Simpsons can’t accept that the show is now an irrelevant relic of a bygone age, so before the new season even started, they released a short clip that at first appears to skewer both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, which makes sense due to the fact that they are now the definite nominees of the two main parties. It’s basically an unfunny parody of an old campaign ad from Hillary’s 2008 campaign, and it also predictably revolves around Marge and Homer, who are apparently unable to have maritals until they decide who to vote (an immediate signal that they’re in fact the dumbest couple in America right now).

Given that The Simpsons are well known for their left-wing bent, I kind of thought that it would basically be a propaganda piece in favour of Hillary Clinton, and sure enough, that becomes clear after they “skewer” both candidates. When Marge and Homer are about to have sex, they stop after Homer whispers his preference for Trump, and Marge says that “if that’s your vote, I question whether I can ever be with you again”, with Homer concluding “and that’s how I became a Democrat”. Ladies and gentlemen, Matt Groening and the other Simpsons writers have finally sunk to the depths of their own leftist echo chamber, to the point that they’re perfectly fine with making outright partisan propaganda (despite criticising such propaganda from Republicans in numerous episodes in earlier seasons).

The message of the whole clip is simple – “vote Democrat or your wife will dump you”. I can’t think of anything more soulless that they have ever written, but then again, they’re such die-hard leftists that nothing is above them. They characterise Donald Trump very poorly, as if they don’t even care about his actual policies (“Put my name on the Lincoln memorial, disband Nato…and make me some scrambled eggs on gold plates.”). That in itself is unsurprising, considering that at this point, the two major candidates are so incredibly repugnant that all the Simpsons writers can do is appeal to party loyalty, if only because the two major parties are all they know. They may as well be slaves to the two-party narrative, because they didn’t even consider the third-party candidates that are rising in popularity. The Libertarian Party’s Gary Johnson and The Green Party’s Jill Stein both make far superior candidates compared to the ones propped up by the mainstream media, and in fact, I would have thought that Matt Groening would have preferred Jill Stein, a candidate who sounds almost exactly like Lisa Simpson. But no, Groening and the other leftists in Hollywood would rather prop up Hillary, a candidate who is unpopular even with many Democrats.

I’ve already made my stance on Hillary quite clear over the past month, and as you can tell, I hate Hillary Clinton. I think she represents everything that is wrong with America’s political system, including the corruption and corporate collusion, and the identarian partisan politics that I’ve come to expect. Given how anti-establishment The Simpsons used to be, I find it even more infuriating that Groening will now endorse someone as painfully pro-establishment as Hillary Clinton, but that’s the least of my worries. I do hope Mr. Groening can sleep at night because by endorsing Hillary, he’s giving a free pass to corruption, and what’s worse if that he’s wrapping it up in warm, bitter, mean-spirited, and terribly unfunny “family-friendly comedy”.

With other episodes, the Simpsons writers merely ridiculed the Republicans simply because they Republicans, or in earlier episodes, because they saw them as representing the horrid establishment of their day, but with the “3am” short, I think the Simpsons writers are showing that they are really scared of the possibility of Donald Trump getting elected, and that’s totally apt because they have become part of the establishment. Why else would their blatant propaganda be praised by the likes of Salon.com, Huffington Post, or Rolling Stone? Like the rest of the cultural and political establishment, they’re scared because Donald Trump is the candidate that people actually want, and they now that a Trump victory is almost certain. Nothing frightens the left more than a party they don’t personally like being democratically voted into power, especially if it turns out that Donald Trump, unlike Hillary, is giving air to the concerns of the working class.

Again, I have to point out that I am not a Trump supporter. I am not a fan of Trump, but there are things about him I like, and things I don’t like. I think he’s a buffoon who’s more talk than policy, but as much as I’m against the Republicans, I hate the Democrats even worse, and I despise the blatant propaganda coming out of the mainstream media, and the way The Simpsons had done it in their short clip is so far the worst example of it. Done without care or subtlety (it’s extremely obvious that they’re pro-Clinton), it’s perhaps the most infuriating symptom of just how far they’ve fallen in pursuit of popularity, reverence, and continued adulation, and that frustrates me to no end. I used to love The Simpsons, but in just two minutes, whatever little respect I had for the show or their writers (and I’m surprised I still had any) has vanished as I see that they have become little more than a whelping Clinton Pravda. If you think I’m exaggerating here, the clip is below, but trust me, if you don’t like Hillary Clinton or the later Simpsons episodes, you will probably not like what you see one bit.

A victory for Britain

brexit

This morning was very tremendous day indeed. It was declared that my country voted to leave the European Union, with a close 51.9% of people voting Leave, against 48.1% who voted Remain. I was honestly shocked and surprised, mainly because of all the cheap tactics the Remain side were using to swing the vote their way. They even had my generation fooled into thinking Brexit would destroy us. It honestly looked as if we were doomed to remain in the EU, but what the Remain camp didn’t count on is the amount of working class people who are tired constantly being lied to, and they’ve made their voice heard.

As a Leave voter, I’m very excited to hear that the people have decided to ignore the scaremongering of the Remain camp. Today has been a victory not just over the EU, but also a victory over the kind of pessimism that has dominated our culture in recent times. I’m very happy to see that the people have decided that they want a better future, and if that wasn’t good enough, it appears that David Cameron himself has conceded defeat, having announced that he will resign in October, resulting in a new Tory leader (and Prime Minister) being elected around the time of the Conservative Party Conference. I have to say that David Cameron has demonstrated a surprising level of maturity and grace in resigning his post. He took the results better than I expected, and even though he lied straight to our faces and fought hard against us Brexiters, at least he didn’t throw a public tantrum. While I hated David Cameron, I have to thank him for at least giving us the vote, and for maintaining handling his defeat with at least a shred of dignity.

As David Cameron resigned, there’s been talk that Boris Johnson may take his place. If he does I’ll be behind him. He performed so well in the Brexit campaign and did such a job at making the case for hope triumphing over fear that I think he would make a fine leader, and I’d vote for him. Nigel Farage, of course, celebrated the result. This is exactly what UKIP set out to achieve in their manifesto, and now Farage has what he wants. I guess that means UKIP won’t mean much to a lot of people anymore, unless immigration is still a big problem for a lot of people, but I think the main thing I take from this is that the establishment has taken quite a hefty blow.

Indeed, Brexit is the biggest sign of a populist revolution spreading across the West. The people are demanding that they be heard, and they’re tired of the political class sneering at them for actually being concerned about the welfare of their country, and there’s even talk of Brexit signalling the victory of Donald Trump. Speaking of Trump, I think that after Brexit, a Trump victory is very likely, considering that his followers are concerned about much of the same things as the Leave camp were, and Trump knows how to tap into the dissatisfaction of the working class, which the Democrats have totally isolated themselves from. The Brexit victory signals a big shake up of the establishment, and the establishment media outlets don’t like it one bit. The Guardian is already feeling the sting of having their self-righteous superiority complex spurned by the working class that they have failed to represent.

For me, today’s result has exposed the immaturity of the Remain camp’s biggest backers, including those in the media. While ordinary Remain voters might have taken the result better, celebrities like Lily Allen took to calling half the population racist. It’s because of that kind of attitude that Leave won. I’ve been hearing a lot of nonsense from people who voted Remain (particularly from the “University Applicants 2016” Facebook group, which might as well be a microcosmic House of Commons), saying that the Leave voters have destroyed the future of this country. I believe that it is THEY how would destroy the future of the country by continuing to allow the EU to destroy democracy. They honestly don’t appear to know what is going on here. By voting Brexit, we have chosen to reject the overbearing globalist elite. By freeing ourselves from the shackles of Brussels, we can make our own choices and mistakes regarding the country’s future. I’m tired of seeing young people complaining about democracy just because the vote didn’t go their way, especially when the argument comes down to belittling your elders as “racists”, and especially when you consider that only 36% of 18-24-year-olds who were registered to vote actually bothered to vote at all. They have no right to complain about how they were robbed of their democratic voice. They had it, but they barely used it, and it’s a telling fact the older you were, the more likely you were to even show up at the polling station. If anything, the old people saved this country.

To all the young people who voted Remain, I know you might be disappointed, but in a way, I think you should be happy. If you hate David Cameron and wanted him gone, you’ve got what you wanted. Cameron’s going to be out of a job in not too long. If you hate Nigel Farage, at least be happy that you might not have to put up with him that much, considering that UKIP have had their wish granted. If you’re worried about the economy, market uncertainty is inevitable. Markets tend to be nervous at the prospect of change, and that’s simply how they work. Even if we do have a recession, recessions don’t last forever, and I think we would be economically worse off if we voted Remain.

Though the Remain camp may protest, Brexit is definitely happening, and I think we will all be better off because of it. Whatever the outcome, the EU referendum has been perhaps the most brutal political campaign I have witnessed, and yet it has reaffirmed the value of democracy in the face of the global elite who seek to destroy it. It’s been a very bitter year so far, but now that we’ve won a better future for this country, I hope that now we can hold our heads up high and move on. As for the rest of Europe, I feel that thanks to us, more and more European countries will want to leave the dying EU (I would definitely support Italy exiting the EU), and with any hope, we may yet see the fall of the tyrannical superstate that is the European Union.

Gary Johnson: A new hope?

gary johnson

With Bernie Sanders unlikely to win the Democrat nomination, the only options left in the presidential race are Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, which basically means having to make a choice between two of the worst presidential candidates in all of American history. For many, this signifies just how broken the American political system is, but I advise you not to give up just yet. After Ted Cruz and John Kasich dropped out of the Republican race, Google searches for the Libertarian Party and its frontrunner Gary Johnson skyrocketed, and yesterday, the Libertarian Party nominated Gary Johnson as its nominee for the presidency.

Prior to his campaign for the presidency, Johnson worked as a door-to-door handyman during the 1970’s, and also founded a company called Big J Enterprises, which grew into one of the largest construction companies in the state of New Mexico. In 1994, he ran successfully for Governor of New Mexico as a fiscally conservative Republican. During his time as governor, he upheld libertarian principles, and even advocated for the decriminalisation of marijuana (which he still does to this day), though he also became known for vetoing more bills than any governor in the United States. Now a member of the Libertarian Party, he is promoting himself as the rational alternative to the two mainstream candidates.

From what I’ve seen and heard of him, I can tell that he really is the alternative that America needs. Unlike Trump and Clinton, who would continue expanding the power of the state, Johnson advocates for a smaller government, wants to end the war on drugs, and is a strong supporter of civil liberties, something the other two candidates couldn’t give a damn about. He also appears to be enough of a moderate political candidate that some media outlets speculated that he may be able to attracted disaffected Republicans and Democrats. Indeed, even before the explosion of pubic interest in the Libertarians, some media outlets speculated that Johnson and the Libertarians would seek to capitalize on popular resentment towards Trump and Clinton.

Of course, due to the prevalence of the Republican/Democrat dichotomy, it probably seems unlikely that a third-party candidate could win the presidency, but I think Gary Johnson might have a chance. Instead of focusing on identity and outrage, Johnson focuses on the issues. Granted, Bernie Sanders focused on social issues as well, but Bernie failed spectacularly, and with careful scrutiny, you could easily deflate Sanders’ socialist platform. Besides, what Johnson wants is extremely reasonable. He wants to end the war on drugs, legalize marijuana, suspend US involvement in foreign countries, and put an end to crony capitalism, which has allowed the current political climate to fester.

Even though I once said that I would support Jill Stein if I lived in the USA, I have to concede that, compared to the other candidates, Gary Johnson is the most reasonable presidential candidate we’ve had in years. He’s also doing quite well in the polls, trailing at 10% of the national vote, which doesn’t sound like much, but it’s a start. Given the amount of people who absolutely despise the two major candidates, I believe that, if done well, the Libertarians could feasibly win the election, finally raising a middle finger to the old party political dichotomy. Best of all, Johnson could offer a silver lining for those who thought that a Trump presidency is inevitable. With all that in mind, I think America now has three options.

  1. Electing a third-party candidate who has actual principles and could competently bring America back from the brink.
  2. Electing the first woman president just for the sake of it, while glossing over her history of corruption and deceit.
  3. Electing a businessman with no political experience (unless you count a failed Reform Party candidacy in the year 2000) who may end up making the country worse.

I highly doubt that a Trump presidency will accomplish anything other that rattling the cages of the establishment momentarily. As for Shillary, she’s bankrolled by corporate interests, and because of that she’ll probably keeps things the way they are, momentarily making ripples in the same unsatisfying way that Obama did. My message is that if you don’t want another four years of the status quo, but worry that Trump will destroy America, then logically the only sane option left is to vote Libertarian, because at least Gary Johnson actually has a vested interest in changing America for the better.

Has anything really changed in Egypt?

egyptian revolution

On this day, two years ago, the Egyptian people overthrew their tyrannical ruler, Hosni Mubarak, who had been in power for almost 30 years. During his time, he expanded Egypt’s Central Security Forces (anti-riot and containment forces), and oversaw a dramatic increase in interior corruption. Prior to the Egyptian Revolution, the people of Egypt were living under “emergency law”, and often subjected to police brutality.

The Egyptian Revolution was one of the most widely covered and glorified of the many revolutions of the Arab Spring, and was largely believed to have been inspired by the Tunisian revolution from one month earlier, and the result of online activism.

But I’m not here to describe the Egyptian Revolution to you. If you want to learn more about it, look it up online. I’m here to ask the fundamental question: has anything changed in Egypt over the past 2 years?

Well, let’s remember that the Egyptian protesters made 17 demands, and of them, 5 of them have not been met as of late. One of the reasons for the protests was economic inequality, which still persists under Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. On January 25, the Egpytians once again cried for social justice, freedom, and the downfall of the current regime.

Well, so much for the power of social networking sites.

The situation is worse when you consider that Egypt is now in the hands of Mohamed Morsi, who, prior to the revolution, was an imprisoned Islamist. In fact, many Egyptians have come to the conclusion that the revolution has failed, because nothing has changed. Some of their other comments vary wildly, up to and including beliefs that the Muslim Brotherhood leaders were sent by America.

There is actually a page that shows what some of the protesters have to say now. Click here to read it.

My point remains, that absolutely nothing has changed in Egypt, so why did we hype the revolution? Moreover, I think this has a lot to say about the cycle of democracy and power. The moral of this story is that you can hope for change all you want, but all you’ll do is replace one clown with another, one thief with another thief, and one devil with another devil. The cycle is the same. Only the people can break that cycle, but they won’t. But they’ll do anything to get rid of the bad ruler in power, even if it means inadvertently installing another.