Why I’m an atheist

I’ve often mentioned that I’m an atheist every now and then. I do admit that I have flaunted it a bit, but I’ve never really explained why I’m an atheist (at least not in this site). So gather ‘round the fireplace, ‘cos you’re about to hear the story of why I became an atheist in the first place.

It all started ten years ago. I had just left America for the last time, and I was getting ready to integrate with British society for the first time. Late in 2003, I started going to church (don’t ask why, it was Mom’s idea), but later left because all that singing about death scared the crap out of me, so I left Sunday school voluntarily. Amazingly, nobody had a problem with it, at least not in the town where I lived. My primary school, on the other hand, felt differently.

After America, I started the British run of my education at Pembroke Dock Community School. Once there, I slowly realized that they were very keen at pushing religion on us. Pretty much every assembly ended with either a hymn, or a song about “saving the environment”, because that’s exactly the kind of crap you parents want to hear from your state schools.

the bible in school

It sure does look like brainwashing to me.

I never wanted anything to do with religion in the first place, but the teachers wouldn’t stop trying to push it on me, going so far as to call their detention “the sin bin”. As far as I remember, there was no shortage of disputes involving religion, and by 2004, I was getting to be extremely belligerent about it. By 2005, I had begun to hate the idea entirely. This is why I never enjoyed RE when I was in secondary school.

Of course, back then, I was a kid with absolutely no sense of composure or self-restraint. As my childhood years and my teenage years ticked away, I learnt that there are people who don’t believe in God, and that they were called “atheists”. As the arguments in favour of atheism (and against believing in God) became more convincing and sympathizable, I eventually started identifying myself as a full blown atheist by the turn of the decade.

As the hype-laden 2000’s faded away, I eventually began to develop the sense of self-restraint that wouldn’t be fully mastered until at least 2010.

Back in 2010, I was also beginning to develop my very own moral compass, with which I was finally able to see the kind of crimes that religion (or the rulers who professed it) is still guilty of. Most of all, I despised the fact that the adults were making kids believe in God in some way, as opposed to letting kids decide their own religious beliefs.

This is why I fervently despised the idea of my nephew being Christened before he could even choose Christianity as a religion (back when he was only a month old).

christening

Another poor helpless child gets thrust into a religion before he/she could even choose. What kind of sick world is this?

As I got older, I became further able to properly articulate my opposition to religion in general, especially when it came to religion and politics.

So there you have it. The reason why I’m an atheist is because I never wanted any part in religion at all, and yet the establishment tried as hard as possible to get me to praise God. You know, if only I had been more aggressive in fighting against the religious domination of the time. It would have made more sense, because they were technically being rather aggressive in trying to brainwash us.

Besides, I was never comfortable with the idea that an all-seeing god was watching me and would happily send me to Hell just because I fell out of line. I’m obviously much happier not believing in any god. If you’re fine with being a Christian, that’s your choice. Just don’t try and make other people think the same way.

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2 thoughts on “Why I’m an atheist

  1. Have you ever read Goerge Orwell’s “1984”? It’s hard not to be atheist after that book. The omnipotent “Big Brother” is just one of the many religious undertones.

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